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WRITER, CONSULTANT AND BROADCASTER SPECIALISING IN BEER, PUBS AND CIDER. BEER WRITER OF THE YEAR 2009 AND 2012

What's new?

What's new?
We've just launched the first ever Beer Marketing Awards - click here for more details!
I'm doing a Masterclass in beer writing with the Guardian in February. Click to find our more.
My latest Publican's Morning Advertiser piece - some pub etiquette tips for Christmas visitors.
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Saturday, 29 September 2012

Telling Stories and Drinking Beer

It's less than six weeks now until the launch of my new book, Shakespeare's Local.

I had some very exciting news about the book yesterday, which I can't reveal until contracts have been signed in a few days' time.  It's also been confirmed that the book will have a US edition some time next year.

But books don't sell themselves these days, so I'm gearing up for various events up and down the country where I'll be reading, talking about the book, and doing beer tastings.

Here's the schedule so far:

Saturday 29th/Sunday 30th September - Taste Cumbria, Cockermouth
At 3pm this afternoon I'll be tasting a world of Cumbrian beers as part of this excellent food and drink festival, and maybe doing the odd reading.  I'll be repeating the tasting again at 1pm tomorrow.

Monday 1st October - Beer tasting mash up at the Manchester Food and Drink Festival
They asked me to do an event.  I said yeah, I could do a tasting of local beers, or beers that match with my books, or a beer and cheese pairing maybe?  Or what about beer and music matching?  It's the right city for it.  And they said, they all sound great - can you do the whole lot?  So I'll be attempting to weave together four completely different events at 7pm on Monday in the festival hub.

Tuesday 9th October - Ilkley Literary Festival
I had a blast here with Hops & Glory a few years ago.  Can't wait to go back and unveil the new show I've put together around Shakespeare's Local - it'll be a multimedia extravaganza I tell you!  And it's already sold out! No pressure then...

Thursday 8th November - Official Book Launch!
Finally hits the shops. I may have a celebratory beer at the George.

Monday 12th November - Corbridge
Details to follow

Tuesday 13th November - Urmston
Details to follow

Wednesday 14th November - Caught by the River at Rough Trade East
I love Caught by the River.  I love Rough Trade East.  Thrilled to be doing an event with them.

Wednesday 21st November - Richmond Literary Festival
An event in a beer shop.  And not just any beer shop - realeale.com's HQ is beer paradise.

There will be many more events to follow, including a few at the George itself in the run-up to Christmas.

Friday, 28 September 2012

Cask ale in volume growth! How to stock the perfect range! Yes, it's the launch of the Cask Report

Cask ale, real ale, handpulled ale - call it what you will - grew by  1.6% in 2011.  This is the first time cask volume has grown (as opposed to not declining by very much) for twenty years.  Sales in 2012 to date are steady, which is still excellent news given that the total UK beer market - down 3.5% in 2011 - is down again this year.  Cask now has such momentum behind it that it has overtaken keg as the most popular draught ale format.



This all made my launch of this year's Cask Report last night very pleasant indeed.  When you're the messenger, it's nice when no one wants to shoot you.

This is the sixth time I've written the Cask Report.  Up to now, it's been a weighty tome that acts as a snapshot of what's happening to cask ale, who's drinking it and why, and a detailed source of information for licensees about how to choose, stock and sell cask ale in a way that will increase pub turnover and profitability.

This year we've done it a little differently.  All the advice for licensees is now running as a monthly section of the Publican's Morning Advertiser called 'Cask Matters'.  With greater frequency we can tailor the advice more precisely, examining in detail how cask can contribute to the character and bottom line of the pub in different ways, with case studies, Q&A's, advice, industry comment and the occasional bit of whimsy from yours truly.  You can download PDFs here.  We should probably do Boxing Day TV ads saying you get a free binder with the first issue and it builds up into a beautiful collection or something.

The market stats are now in a thinner, flimsier Cask Report that gives a much more concise and easily navigable picture of what's happening to cask ale.  Apart from the basic stats, this year's report examines in further detail two issues that have emerged as key in the last couple of years:

  • What are the main drivers fo cask ale growth?  Why do drinkers like it?  And what are the barriers to trial among those who have never tried it?
  • What range of cask ales should a landlord stock?
Drivers and barriers
53% of British adults have now tried cask ale.  Among those who have tried it, 84% have gone on to drink it, at least occasionally.  People like cask because of its flavour and variety - microbrewers are now brewing a wide array of different beer styles:


The problem for cask is that 71% people who've tried it drink it occasionally or rarely.  Only 13% claim to drink it often or regularly.  Like 'Guinness drinkers' who only ever have a pint on Paddy's Day, an awful lot of cask ale drinkers are people who tend to order a Peroni or Stella, until the rare occasions they go to a beer festival or visit a nice country pub. 

Those who love cask, as well as loving the flavour, tend to have other reasons for drinking it too.  Some like to support a local producer, others a great British tradition. Some like it for its natural ingredients.  Cask ale allows people who know it to support causes or make statements about things they care about.  This gives brewers and pubs a list of things they could say about cask to encourage trial, or get occasional drinkers more interested.

Among those who haven't tried cask, there are no real barriers - they just haven;t been given a good reason why they should try it:

  

The negative stereotypes about it being warm, flat or an old man's drink are tiny reasons compared to a simple lack of any reason why they should care.  Again, looking at committed drinkers gives us some good clues as to what those good reasons might be.

Stocking the optimal cask ale range
Talk to a beer blogger and they'll tell you you should be stocking awesome craft ales from the awesome new wave of microbrewers using awesome New World hops and awesome wood ageing and an awesome lack of finings.  Talk to a regional brewer and they'll tell you people want to see familiar, tried and trusted brands on the bar.

Both are right.

If I were to open a pub in London tomorrow, London Pride and Doom Bar would be on the bar permanently.  I would then have a seasonal beer from a traditional British family brewer, and three pumps stocking a range of IPAs, milds, porters, stouts, golden ales, all depending on seasonality and availability, the most eclectic and exciting mix I could find.

Most readers of this blog, I would guess, are dismissive of Doom Bar.  So am I. But it sells by the bucketload, and it sells to people who would never buy Magic Rock Human Cannonball.  There are at least 3000 different cask ales in Britain, which is amazing.

But know what?  The top 39 most recognised brands account for half of the total market volume.  Most pubs are stocking too many unfamiliar beers and not enough recognised brands.  Sales go up the more familiar, established brands you have on the bar.

Conversely, it's eclectic, unfamiliar beers, often brewed by micros, that are driving the current excitement in the cask ale market.  Stock only familiar brands and people will think your range is crashingly dull, and rightly so.

Also - and this is common sense, but you'd be surprised - know your audience.  If you are a self-declared craft beer bar and you know that your clientele consists of people who actively seek out new beers, weigh your range to rotating new and unfamiliar beers.  If you're a typical high street pub, refresh your range constantly, but always have a few favourites on the bar.

Whoever you are though, it's good business sense to have both.  75% of cask ale drinkers say a familiar, trusted brand is important when choosing what beer to drink.  And 78% say they like to try new beers from microbreweries.  You may have noticed that adds up to more then a hundred - the same people want both familiarity and novelty - and that's consistent across every piece fo research we did for the report.

Download.  Digest.  And maybe we can stop arguing - from a commercial point of view at least - about what's best, big brands or micros?  Both are essential from the point of view of a good pub.